Discussion:
street tamales
(too old to reply)
Eddie
2005-07-28 03:23:02 UTC
Permalink
Occasionally I buy one or two tamales from vendors, always Mexicans,
at parking lots or in front of stores. Most have been ok, nothing
spectacular. A few I would not return again. I always think of the
health safety factor but so far have never reacted negatively.
The other day I saw two ladies selling out of their station wagon. I
pulled the bus over and bought one. (always the traditional pork type)
Well let me tell 'ya that was the best homemade tamale I've ever
eaten. And she served it with salsa y crema, in a styrofoam plate
with fork and napkin. For one buck too. A couple of days later I
bought two more. I highly recommend this vendor. If you're ever in
the area, she's on 24th just S. of Williams in SJ next to the
laundromat. Very friendly, gregarious ladies too. When they saw my
bus she wanted the passengers to come out and buy some. I explained
that I couldn't do that because I had a schedule to keep. In that
case, she said, here are two tamales and you can share. :-)
Eddie
Karen
2005-07-29 15:58:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eddie
Occasionally I buy one or two tamales from vendors, always Mexicans,
at parking lots or in front of stores. Most have been ok, nothing
spectacular. A few I would not return again. I always think of the
health safety factor but so far have never reacted negatively.
The other day I saw two ladies selling out of their station wagon. I
pulled the bus over and bought one. (always the traditional pork type)
Well let me tell 'ya that was the best homemade tamale I've ever
eaten. And she served it with salsa y crema, in a styrofoam plate
with fork and napkin. For one buck too. A couple of days later I
bought two more. I highly recommend this vendor. If you're ever in
the area, she's on 24th just S. of Williams in SJ next to the
laundromat. Very friendly, gregarious ladies too. When they saw my
bus she wanted the passengers to come out and buy some. I explained
that I couldn't do that because I had a schedule to keep. In that
case, she said, here are two tamales and you can share. :-)
Eddie
How come you didn't want this archived? This could come in handy
someday.

Karen
bizbee
2005-07-31 00:57:55 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:23:02 GMT in
Post by Eddie
Occasionally I buy one or two tamales from vendors, always Mexicans,
at parking lots or in front of stores. Most have been ok, nothing
spectacular. A few I would not return again. I always think of the
health safety factor but so far have never reacted negatively.
The other day I saw two ladies selling out of their station wagon. I
pulled the bus over and bought one. (always the traditional pork type)
Well let me tell 'ya that was the best homemade tamale I've ever
eaten. And she served it with salsa y crema, in a styrofoam plate
with fork and napkin. For one buck too. A couple of days later I
bought two more. I highly recommend this vendor. If you're ever in
the area, she's on 24th just S. of Williams in SJ next to the
laundromat. Very friendly, gregarious ladies too. When they saw my
bus she wanted the passengers to come out and buy some. I explained
that I couldn't do that because I had a schedule to keep. In that
case, she said, here are two tamales and you can share. :-)
Eddie
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
Eddie
2005-07-31 07:28:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:23:02 GMT in
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
I've been eating in restaurants for about 60 years and I've never got
sick.
I've been eating from roadside eateries for about 60 years and I've
never got sick.
I have eaten from about 100 taco stands in Mexico and I've never got
sick.
Just think what I would have missed if I *never* had eaten from those
outdoor places.
I guess that's just one of life's little pleasures I wouldn't give up
for the sake of not having an "A" grade.
Eddie
bizbee
2005-07-31 23:08:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 07:28:06 GMT in
Post by Eddie
Post by bizbee
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:23:02 GMT in
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
I've been eating in restaurants for about 60 years and I've never got
sick.
I've been eating from roadside eateries for about 60 years and I've
never got sick.
I have eaten from about 100 taco stands in Mexico and I've never got
sick.
Just think what I would have missed if I *never* had eaten from those
outdoor places.
I guess that's just one of life's little pleasures I wouldn't give up
for the sake of not having an "A" grade.
Eddie
Congratualations, but you not getting sick isn't exactly a raving
review. Do you support doing away with health inspections in
restaurants, and if not, why not, since you don't seem to have a
problem with eating food that could have been prepared by a nine year
old child, picking their nose and wiping their butt, on an unclean
table that the cat just ran across after using the litter box.
To each their own, of course, my comment was only one of observation
as to how anal some people can be. I hasten to point out that every
year, <thousands> of people fall ill eating in restaurants. Your
failure to join the crowd isn't exactly a seal of approval for
anything except your luck.

And, I have to say, your comment about not passing on a place because
it doesn't have an A grade is a good one... I think the grading system
is pretty lame, to tell you the truth, since I've dealt personally
with health inspectors who will ding you because you cop an attitude
with the guy and don't kiss his ass. Not an A? Hey, as long as it
<passed> I don't see a problem! Maybe they're busy paying more
attention to customers and food prep than they are to the placement of
a dirty towel on the floor instead of the laundry bin...
Dennis
2005-08-04 00:57:10 UTC
Permalink
You've ben lucky. I've had the honor of food poisoning three times in my
life, only one a street food place. Doesnt stop me from frequenting any
place but I am cautious.

Dennias
Post by Eddie
Post by bizbee
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:23:02 GMT in
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
I've been eating in restaurants for about 60 years and I've never got
sick.
I've been eating from roadside eateries for about 60 years and I've
never got sick.
I have eaten from about 100 taco stands in Mexico and I've never got
sick.
Just think what I would have missed if I *never* had eaten from those
outdoor places.
I guess that's just one of life's little pleasures I wouldn't give up
for the sake of not having an "A" grade.
Eddie
SMS
2005-07-31 20:56:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:23:02 GMT in
Post by Eddie
Occasionally I buy one or two tamales from vendors, always Mexicans,
at parking lots or in front of stores. Most have been ok, nothing
spectacular. A few I would not return again. I always think of the
health safety factor but so far have never reacted negatively.
The other day I saw two ladies selling out of their station wagon. I
pulled the bus over and bought one. (always the traditional pork type)
Well let me tell 'ya that was the best homemade tamale I've ever
eaten. And she served it with salsa y crema, in a styrofoam plate
with fork and napkin. For one buck too. A couple of days later I
bought two more. I highly recommend this vendor. If you're ever in
the area, she's on 24th just S. of Williams in SJ next to the
laundromat. Very friendly, gregarious ladies too. When they saw my
bus she wanted the passengers to come out and buy some. I explained
that I couldn't do that because I had a schedule to keep. In that
case, she said, here are two tamales and you can share. :-)
Eddie
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
I'd much rather eat a street tamale, then to eat at Fresh Choice or
Sweet Tomatoes.
bizbee
2005-07-31 23:10:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 20:56:17 GMT in
Post by SMS
Post by bizbee
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 03:23:02 GMT in
Post by Eddie
Occasionally I buy one or two tamales from vendors, always Mexicans,
at parking lots or in front of stores. Most have been ok, nothing
spectacular. A few I would not return again. I always think of the
health safety factor but so far have never reacted negatively.
The other day I saw two ladies selling out of their station wagon. I
pulled the bus over and bought one. (always the traditional pork type)
Well let me tell 'ya that was the best homemade tamale I've ever
eaten. And she served it with salsa y crema, in a styrofoam plate
with fork and napkin. For one buck too. A couple of days later I
bought two more. I highly recommend this vendor. If you're ever in
the area, she's on 24th just S. of Williams in SJ next to the
laundromat. Very friendly, gregarious ladies too. When they saw my
bus she wanted the passengers to come out and buy some. I explained
that I couldn't do that because I had a schedule to keep. In that
case, she said, here are two tamales and you can share. :-)
Eddie
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
I'd much rather eat a street tamale, then to eat at Fresh Choice or
Sweet Tomatoes.
Again, good luck. Hope you don't get the end of what was in the
refrigerator.
Ciccio
2005-07-31 21:38:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
Nothing odd about it. Most are from different groups. Ones that care about
HD inspections, and ones that don't . I'd venture a guess that the latter
will patronize the same places as the former, but not vice versa.

Ciccio
bizbee
2005-07-31 23:19:23 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 21:38:09 GMT in
Post by Ciccio
Post by bizbee
Ya know, it's odd how people are so picky about cleanliness in a
restaurant... so picky that the health departments actually pass out
<grades>, and in some areas those grades have to be displayed--not to
mention that the latest HD report of whatever restaurant you like can
be found online in many areas of California... and then people buy
food out of the trunk of someone's car in a parking lot.
Nothing odd about it. Most are from different groups. Ones that care about
HD inspections, and ones that don't . I'd venture a guess that the latter
will patronize the same places as the former, but not vice versa.
Ciccio
Yeah, I'm pretty sure you're right on that one.
I'm wondering how many of the people who eat street meat would be on
the phone to the HD the first time they got a bowl of lukewarm chowder
at the Fish Market, or be howling about suing someone because of a bad
clam or two sucked down at the California Cafe.

Just as an observation on food-borne illnesses... my guess is, one bad
tamale and it will be the last street meat consumed by the person who
gets sick. Example--Eddie claims in near 60 years he's never gotten
food poisoning. That much is obvious, because if he had, he'd never
want to take the chance of getting it again. I'm not sure if shitting
your pants while you vomit, then collapsing in a pool of the mixture
on your bathroom floor is the worst part, or the raging three day
headach and inability to stand because your head is spinning and all
the muscles in your body ache like you've been clubbed like Rodney
King.
Pretty much a toss-up (no pun intended) I guess.
Steve Pope
2005-07-31 23:49:17 UTC
Permalink
Assuming the street tamale is steaming hot (and they
usually are) I think there is little chance of getting sick
from one.

Much safer than, say a burrito, which is assembled by hand and
then not re-cooked before being served.

S.
I***@JPS.Net
2005-08-01 09:52:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Pope
Assuming the street tamale is steaming hot (and they
usually are) I think there is little chance of getting sick
from one.
Icono Clast Oct 27 2003, 3:06 am
Newsgroups: rec.travel.usa-canada, rec.travel.europe, rec.travel.asia,
rec.travel.latin-america

Subject: Comida típica
Post by Steve Pope
Don't you normally eat from street vendors and the like ?
When I can.
Me, too. I'm a great advocate of street food. It's delicious,
healthful, and usually healthier than fancy restaurant food. During
nine weeks in South America, for example, I got three doses of food
poisoning: Each one was after eating in a first-class joint. The
street food never bothered me. Quite the contrary: my body accepted it
as an excellent source of fuel and nutrition.

Someone in a rec.travel forum responded, in paraphrase, "Of course!
The street food has high turnover. Fancy restaurants had to wait for
your arrival."

Further, street food is "typical food" meaning it's most reflective of
local taste. That's one of the most fun things of travel, experiencing
the local cuisine with the locals as the locals prefer it. They
usually know what's strange to you, are pleased when you like it and
amused if you don't.

To support my allegation, I urge you to visit the main square of your
town where food vendors congegrate. And I further encourage you to
visit your local amsuement park or visiting carnival. You'll find the
food you love and will probably be unable to resist procuring a
portion of your favorite.

[The thread grew to eighteen posts.]
____________________________________________________________
A San Franciscan in (where else?) San Francisco
http://geocities.com/dancefest / http://geocities.com/iconoc/
ICQ: http://wwp.mirabilis.com/19098 103 IClast at SFbay Net
ll
2005-08-01 17:43:09 UTC
Permalink
During nine weeks in South America, for example, I got three doses
of food poisoning: Each one was after eating in a first-class joint.
The only time I've ever gotten badly sick in Mexico was after
eating in a "first class joint". But we steer away from _most_
street food, looking at the food they offer and determining its
need for refrigeration before we decide.

Herself usually recites chapter and verse from the Serv-Safe
course in my ear.
bizbee
2005-08-02 01:06:38 UTC
Permalink
On 1 Aug 2005 02:52:42 -0700 in
Post by I***@JPS.Net
and usually healthier than fancy restaurant food.
hmmm... generally speaking, I'd have to see a cite on this one...
however, in many parts of the world, it's certainly on a par with it.

Somehow unrefrigerated meat and water from a dubious source (not
necessarily, but I have no idea where it came from, and in a lot of
places, there's plenty of dubious sources) aren't high on my list of
contributing healthy items, and somehow that fourteen year old kid
selling the food isn't necessarily interested in your health.
I've eaten my share of this stuff, too, and never gotten sick, as I've
done my time in third-world countries. I'm not sure how many dogs,
monkeys, coati mundis and sloths I've eaten off a stick sold on a
street corner.
In any case, it seems I remember reading someplace that more people
get food poisoning at home than anywhere. Don't ask for a source on
that.
Leila
2005-08-02 05:02:18 UTC
Permalink
My mom got typhoid from an ice cream shop in Damascus in 1970. She
could see they weren't washing the dishes in soap and hot water, but
she just didn't think aobut it until after she got really sick.

In Lebanon most middle class people are very paranoid about street
food, and even regular restaurant and shop food. I was told in 2000,
upon leaving Beirut for a visit to Tripoli, that I should *not* eat the
pastry there no matter what; or only eat at one particular place that
is recommended as clean. As a kid I was not allowed to eat ice cream,
pastry or any other food besides dry cracker bread from street vendors;
and when I wanted falafel, they only let us buy it from one particular
shop in Sidon. Again, since I caught hepatitis A, my mom got typhoid,
and there was a cholera outbreak in the neighborhood that year, such
precautions seemed justified.

I've had food poisoning twice in my life - once from a restaurant in
Paris, and once from a bad wedding palace in Lebanon. I never want to
repeat the experience. So I pass up all those delicious taco trucks
near me in East Oakland. I'm tempted by the tamales but I just can't
take the risk. In general I have a cast iron stomach and don't get
sick. But the few biggies were enough to convince me to be careful.

Leila
ll
2005-08-02 16:25:55 UTC
Permalink
I pass up all those delicious taco trucks near me in East Oakland.
Aren't they inspected by the health department just like
sitdown restaurants are?

We stopped by the Tacos El Gordo truck (west side of Intl Blvd
north of High) on the way back from S.F. Saturday afternoon.
Mmmm. As we munched on tacos, we said "This is better than
Mexico! Here we have the health department."
Not that there's ever a sure thing.
Leila
2005-08-02 17:11:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by ll
Aren't they inspected by the health department just like
sitdown restaurants are?

If they are, that's quite reassuring.

Leila
Pete Fraser
2005-08-02 17:32:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by ll
I pass up all those delicious taco trucks near me in East Oakland.
Aren't they inspected by the health department just like
sitdown restaurants are?
Although somehow the food quality is better.

The truck at High and Coliseum (next to the lumbar yard)
has very good food, but it's run by the same folks that
run La Piñata in Alameda. La Piñata is expensive, and
almost attains mediocrity on a good day.
bizbee
2005-08-04 01:29:25 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 2 Aug 2005 10:32:29 -0700 in
Post by Pete Fraser
Post by ll
I pass up all those delicious taco trucks near me in East Oakland.
Aren't they inspected by the health department just like
sitdown restaurants are?
Although somehow the food quality is better.
The truck at High and Coliseum (next to the lumbar yard)
has very good food, but it's run by the same folks that
run La Piñata in Alameda. La Piñata is expensive, and
almost attains mediocrity on a good day.
I think a lot of roach coaches are owned by the same corporation,
generally a place, like a restaurant, that doesn't want to be put out
of business by the HD. If you've ever been inside one of those things,
it's easily cleanable with a flame thrower and strong solvent, they're
built that way. Take the food out, and wash everything out with a
hose. Those hot dog carts (that are licensed) meet some pretty stiff
requirements too, however <it's just a cart,> not like cleaning a
restaurant kitchen. Use pre-packaged food, and you're ready to rip.

On the other hand, who knows where street meat was prepped. Someone's
garage? You know, where the rats live in the rafters? How old is that
meat, anyway, and where did it come from? If the vendor's husband is
rebuilding his motorcycle engine in the same room, this is probably
not food that you'd want to eat.
Call me paranoid, but, well, I'm paranoid.
Alison Chaiken
2005-08-04 03:28:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
On the other hand, who knows where street meat was
prepped. Someone's garage? You know, where the rats live in the
rafters? How old is that meat, anyway, and where did it come from?
Evolution gave us a nose and eyes so that we could see if meat smells
off or looks slimy. I bet I could smell spoiled meat at a roach coach
from 100 feet away. Your nose: better than the best Michelin guide.
Odors from a kitchen are generally weaker so that smell is less
helpful in choosing a restaurant.

I've never had ill effects from a roach coach. My most recent, highly
spectacular food poisoning was from a restaurant at the Montreal
airport. YMMV.
--
Alison Chaiken "From:" address above is valid.
(650) 236-2231 [daytime] http://www.wsrcc.com/alison/
Mr. Wilson [ . . . ] and even his wife's outing have as much to do with
the real story here as Janet Leigh's theft of office cash has to do
with the mayhem that ensues at the Bates Motel in "Psycho."
-- Frank Rich, NY Times, July 17
Steve Pope
2005-08-04 03:41:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alison Chaiken
I've never had ill effects from a roach coach. My most recent, highly
spectacular food poisoning was from a restaurant at the Montreal
airport. YMMV.
Since depending on the microbe, food poisoning can take anywhere
from a couple hours to a few days to set in, how can you be
certain it was the airport food?

S.
D.A.Martinich
2005-08-05 01:22:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Alison Chaiken
I've never had ill effects from a roach coach. My most recent, highly
spectacular food poisoning was from a restaurant at the Montreal
airport. YMMV.
Since depending on the microbe, food poisoning can take anywhere
from a couple hours to a few days to set in, how can you be
certain it was the airport food?
S.
Great point Steve. You almost never will know unless you can take a
sample and have it analyzed. Another point: cooking may not help if
the food pathogen leaves a toxin in the food item and it's heat stable.
Also a major path of transferring pathogens is by food handlers.
You've all seen those signs in restaurant bathrooms. And, of course,
water can be a source of disease. Kind of a crapshoot, isn't it?
Stay Well ;-]
D.M.
bizbee
2005-08-05 21:03:19 UTC
Permalink
On 4 Aug 2005 18:22:23 -0700 in
Post by D.A.Martinich
Great point Steve. You almost never will know unless you can take a
sample and have it analyzed.
Wait! What about the selective rejection theory?!
bizbee
2005-08-05 21:02:16 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 4 Aug 2005 03:41:47 +0000 (UTC) in
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Alison Chaiken
I've never had ill effects from a roach coach. My most recent, highly
spectacular food poisoning was from a restaurant at the Montreal
airport. YMMV.
Since depending on the microbe, food poisoning can take anywhere
from a couple hours to a few days to set in, how can you be
certain it was the airport food?
S.
Another good point, but it's usually pretty easy for a person to pin
it down, unless they've been eating three squares the entire time.

Here's one for you... So, I'm working saute in this seafood place, the
chef comes up to me and says "how do the mussels look?"
Hmmm... I pull the drawer open... they look fine to me. I smell
them... it smells like the ocean. I poke them around a little...
they're all tightly closed. We conclude, together, that they're just
fine.
"What's the problem?" I ask.
"Some guy got sick after lunch and he said it was the mussels."
"And was that all he ate?"
"No, he split them with somoene else, for an appetizer," he said.
"And what makes him so certain it was the mussels, let alone not
something he ate for breakfast?"
"He said that's what he threw up."

Wow... selective rejection. I wasn't aware that the human body could
sort out the good from the bad, and just puke up the bad stuff.
Oh, yeah... The person he split them with didn't get sick. I didn't
ask how much liquor he drank. That's always my favorite "I got sick, I
was dizzy and I puked."
Wouldn't be the three martinis and two bottles of wine, eh?
Michael Sierchio
2005-08-04 16:57:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alison Chaiken
Evolution gave us a nose and eyes so that we could see if meat smells
off or looks slimy. ...
No. Your senses will NOT prevent you from getting sick from Salmonella,
Staph, Listeria, Shigella, etc. That's why there are fairly rigid food
handling safety guidelines. Keep hot food above 140F, keep cold food
below 40F, and spread that warm chicken salad into shallow trays before
putting it in the walk-in, so it cools quickly enough.
bizbee
2005-08-05 20:53:37 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 03:28:09 GMT in <***@bonnet.wsrcc.com>,
Alison Chaiken
Post by Alison Chaiken
Post by bizbee
On the other hand, who knows where street meat was
prepped. Someone's garage? You know, where the rats live in the
rafters? How old is that meat, anyway, and where did it come from?
Evolution gave us a nose and eyes so that we could see if meat smells
off or looks slimy. I bet I could smell spoiled meat at a roach coach
from 100 feet away. Your nose: better than the best Michelin guide.
Odors from a kitchen are generally weaker so that smell is less
helpful in choosing a restaurant.
Good point, however things like botulism and salmonella are odorless,
as far as I know... but it never hurts to give <anything> a sniff and
a look.
Spam Gourmet
2005-08-05 21:04:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alison Chaiken
Your nose: better than the best Michelin guide.
So why do folks insist on eating stinky tofu and durian. ;) And for those
who caught this week's episode of Bourdain's No Reservations, why do people
still eat shark?

Yeah, yeah. "It tastes better than it smells." When it reeks as badly as
that, it doesn't take much for it to taste better than it smells.

--A
Joseph Michael Bay
2005-08-05 21:26:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spam Gourmet
Post by Alison Chaiken
Your nose: better than the best Michelin guide.
So why do folks insist on eating stinky tofu and durian. ;)
Or most kinds of cheese.

I think there's got to be a learned aspect to smell aversion, since
the odor of really pungent cheese is appealing to me *if* it's coming
from some cheese, and horribly disgusting if it's coming from just
about anything else.
--
Chimes peal joy. Bah. Joseph Michael Bay
Icy colon barge Cancer Biology
Frosty divine Saturn Stanford University
By reading this line you agree to mow my lawn. NO GIVEBACKS.
Spam Gourmet
2005-08-05 21:59:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joseph Michael Bay
Or most kinds of cheese.
I think there's got to be a learned aspect to smell aversion, since
the odor of really pungent cheese is appealing to me *if* it's coming
from some cheese, and horribly disgusting if it's coming from just
about anything else.
ROFL. How about a new game show called "Is it stinky cheese or smelly
feet?" All contestants are blindfolded and asked to tell the difference.

--A
bizbee
2005-08-04 01:22:55 UTC
Permalink
On 1 Aug 2005 22:02:18 -0700 in
Post by Leila
My mom got typhoid from an ice cream shop in Damascus in 1970. She
could see they weren't washing the dishes in soap and hot water, but
she just didn't think aobut it until after she got really sick.
In Lebanon most middle class people are very paranoid about street
food, and even regular restaurant and shop food. I was told in 2000,
upon leaving Beirut for a visit to Tripoli, that I should *not* eat the
pastry there no matter what; or only eat at one particular place that
is recommended as clean. As a kid I was not allowed to eat ice cream,
pastry or any other food besides dry cracker bread from street vendors;
and when I wanted falafel, they only let us buy it from one particular
shop in Sidon. Again, since I caught hepatitis A, my mom got typhoid,
and there was a cholera outbreak in the neighborhood that year, such
precautions seemed justified.
I've had food poisoning twice in my life - once from a restaurant in
Paris, and once from a bad wedding palace in Lebanon. I never want to
repeat the experience. So I pass up all those delicious taco trucks
near me in East Oakland. I'm tempted by the tamales but I just can't
take the risk. In general I have a cast iron stomach and don't get
sick. But the few biggies were enough to convince me to be careful.
Leila
The hair on my neck is standing up. When I was chowing this kind of
stuff was when I was wayyyy younger, with lots less common sense. Ya
pays yer nickel, ya takes yer chances. Personally, tempting as it all
is and as great as it smells, it's easier to stay away from, and never
take the chance, or pay the nickel.
Leila
2005-08-02 05:05:05 UTC
Permalink
"Of course! The street food has high turnover. Fancy restaurants had to wait >for your arrival."
It's true that the two cases of food poisoning I've ever had were from
restaurants. So your point is well taken. I still exercise caution
around street food, and furthermore I'm even pickier about what my kids
can eat. OTOH my babysitters are friends with a lady who sells tamales,
and they eat them all the time...I might take a chance on those, since
she's a friend of a friend.

Leila
bizbee
2005-08-02 01:07:23 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 23:49:17 +0000 (UTC) in
Post by Steve Pope
Assuming the street tamale is steaming hot (and they
usually are) I think there is little chance of getting sick
from one.
Yeah, you're right, of course... as long as the cat shit is cooked,
you're alright...
George Grapman
2005-08-02 01:46:58 UTC
Permalink
Last week the NY Times food section had an item abut spices killing
bacteria. Maybe the fact that I like street food and spicy food is a
good thing.
--
To reply via e-mail please delete 1 c from paccbell
Chester
2005-08-04 17:10:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
I'm wondering how many of the people who eat street meat would be on
the phone to the HD the first time they got a bowl of lukewarm chowder
at the Fish Market, or be howling about suing someone because of a bad
clam or two sucked down at the California Cafe.
I dunno. But I'd bet that people who frequent street vendors are, as a
group, less likely to get litigious about food poisoning -- whether at
a street vendor or "legit" restaurant -- than people who don't
frequent street vendors.

The only time I ever got food poisoning was from the free tacos served
at the campus pub, despite chasing said tacos with plenty of booze.

Chester
Steve Pope
2005-08-04 17:15:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chester
I dunno. But I'd bet that people who frequent street vendors are, as a
group, less likely to get litigious about food poisoning -- whether at
a street vendor or "legit" restaurant -- than people who don't
frequent street vendors.
Lawyer eats street tamale -- details at 11
bizbee
2005-08-05 21:17:29 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 4 Aug 2005 17:15:39 +0000 (UTC) in
Post by Steve Pope
Post by Chester
I dunno. But I'd bet that people who frequent street vendors are, as a
group, less likely to get litigious about food poisoning -- whether at
a street vendor or "legit" restaurant -- than people who don't
frequent street vendors.
Lawyer eats street tamale -- details at 11
"Is there any trace of mammal products in this veggie tamale?"
bizbee
2005-08-05 21:16:23 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 10:10:20 -0700 in
Post by Chester
Post by bizbee
I'm wondering how many of the people who eat street meat would be on
the phone to the HD the first time they got a bowl of lukewarm chowder
at the Fish Market, or be howling about suing someone because of a bad
clam or two sucked down at the California Cafe.
I dunno. But I'd bet that people who frequent street vendors are, as a
group, less likely to get litigious about food poisoning -- whether at
a street vendor or "legit" restaurant -- than people who don't
frequent street vendors.
The only time I ever got food poisoning was from the free tacos served
at the campus pub, despite chasing said tacos with plenty of booze.
Chester
Yeah, they were charging for the tacos several hours earlier, until
they started looking funny.

You're likely right on here, I for one, as a restaurant worker,
wouldn't be inclined to threaten a lawsuit (actually I think the
litigious mentality is a personality thing, the same people threaten
to sue if someone farts in their BMW or tells someone to shut their
kid the hell up). For one, you stand about a snowball's chance in
hell, unless you wind up with PSD or something like that, that's
trackable, but that aside, and, no pun intended, shit happens. Of
course, it's real easy to cop that attitude while I'm sitting here at
home without a case of food poisoning, but I'm sure you know what I
mean. Doesn't mean I wouldn't be pissed, or that I wouldn't call the
chef, or stop by and give him a piece of my mind (and maybe vomit on
his shoes); not sure I'd be anxious for a comped meal, unless it was
somewhere I went all the time, or people I knew were involved. Comped
massive quantities of alcohol may be a different story--just to keep
the peace, you understand. Wouldn't want to offend.
Alison Chaiken
2005-08-06 03:47:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chester
The only time I ever got food poisoning was from the free tacos
served at the campus pub, despite chasing said tacos with plenty of
booze.
Not enough booze obviously.

When I was in college, the town board of health shut down all the
street vendors, including an eggroll stand where I was a regular
patron. I'm sure the local restaurants had nothing to do with it.

At work I inquired whether it would be possible for lunch trucks to
visit our parking lot, where they would undoubtedly be overrun with
eager customers. I was told that the company's contract with Marriott
compels company security to prevent such visits.
Post by Chester
Since depending on the microbe, food poisoning can take anywhere
from a couple hours to a few days to set in, how can you be certain
it was the airport food?
I always base my theories about food poisoning on whether my dining
companions have also gotten sick. I agree that if you've been eating
alone, you'll never have enough data.
--
Alison Chaiken "From:" address above is valid.
(650) 236-2231 [daytime] http://www.wsrcc.com/alison/
Mr. Wilson [ . . . ] and even his wife's outing have as much to do with
the real story here as Janet Leigh's theft of office cash has to do
with the mayhem that ensues at the Bates Motel in "Psycho."
-- Frank Rich, NY Times, July 17
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