Discussion:
OT: Dry Counties
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Todd Michel McComb
2004-09-25 21:17:19 UTC
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Given my planned cross-country tour, and doing some driving through
the South, it suddenly occurred to me that I should probably consider
the availability of ordinary refreshment such as beer along the
way. Does anyone know a resource which gives detailed information
on alcohol laws around the country, to be used as a sort of road
map?
misha
2004-09-26 09:50:49 UTC
Permalink
If you're a veteran of a foreign war, join the VFW. If you've served in
the armed forces, join the American Legion. I'm pretty sure there are
plenty of posts in the South.
Post by Todd Michel McComb
Given my planned cross-country tour, and doing some driving through
the South, it suddenly occurred to me that I should probably consider
the availability of ordinary refreshment such as beer along the
way. Does anyone know a resource which gives detailed information
on alcohol laws around the country, to be used as a sort of road
map?
bizbee
2004-09-26 12:05:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by misha
If you're a veteran of a foreign war, join the VFW. If you've served in
the armed forces, join the American Legion. I'm pretty sure there are
plenty of posts in the South.
That's not going to fix anything in a dry county if you're looking to
buy a beer.
Post by misha
Post by Todd Michel McComb
Given my planned cross-country tour, and doing some driving through
the South, it suddenly occurred to me that I should probably consider
the availability of ordinary refreshment such as beer along the
way. Does anyone know a resource which gives detailed information
on alcohol laws around the country, to be used as a sort of road
map?
Tak Nakamoto
2004-09-26 15:00:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
That's not going to fix anything in a dry county if you're looking to
buy a beer.
I'd be a whole lot more worried about where I'd find good coffee. Everyone
in the South always knows where to get alcohol. Getting good coffee however
....

Tak Nakamoto
George Grapman
2004-09-26 15:43:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
Post by misha
If you're a veteran of a foreign war, join the VFW. If you've served in
the armed forces, join the American Legion. I'm pretty sure there are
plenty of posts in the South.
That's not going to fix anything in a dry county if you're looking to
buy a beer.
Depends on the state. I once lived in a small town that only allowed
beer to be served in bars and restaurants. Private clubs were exempted.
Post by bizbee
Post by misha
Post by Todd Michel McComb
Given my planned cross-country tour, and doing some driving through
the South, it suddenly occurred to me that I should probably consider
the availability of ordinary refreshment such as beer along the
way. Does anyone know a resource which gives detailed information
on alcohol laws around the country, to be used as a sort of road
map?
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bizbee
2004-09-26 23:24:43 UTC
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On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 15:43:22 GMT in
Post by George Grapman
Post by bizbee
Post by misha
If you're a veteran of a foreign war, join the VFW. If you've served in
the armed forces, join the American Legion. I'm pretty sure there are
plenty of posts in the South.
That's not going to fix anything in a dry county if you're looking to
buy a beer.
Depends on the state. I once lived in a small town that only allowed
beer to be served in bars and restaurants. Private clubs were exempted.
Again, on a drive through the south, locating every VFW hall on your
route in order to plan a drinking schedule isn't going to solve
anything, unless you're a complete alcoholic that can't get more than
an hour down the road without a drink.
Your time would be better spent in recovery than looking for a route
full of open counties. The next county is never that far away, and
anyone in town can point you to the fastest route. Also,
liquor-by-the-drink states are different than dry counties, and you
can usually buy at a state store or grocery, too.
Personally, I wouldn't go without my ice chest full of whatever beer I
happened to choose. Problem solved.
Todd Michel McComb
2004-09-26 23:32:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
Personally, I wouldn't go without my ice chest full of whatever
beer I happened to choose. Problem solved.
I can do that, but for a two month trip, there are various things
involved. If I can get this information beforehand, it would remove
any possibility of surprise.
bizbee
2004-09-27 04:04:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Todd Michel McComb
Post by bizbee
Personally, I wouldn't go without my ice chest full of whatever
beer I happened to choose. Problem solved.
I can do that, but for a two month trip, there are various things
involved. If I can get this information beforehand, it would remove
any possibility of surprise.
Sweet Jesus, two months in hell. Well, at least the food's good. A
good source might be just to place a few calls to people you're
visiting and places you're staying. I'm sure the individual states'
ABC's websites would have the info too.
I've lived in some places with some odd liquor laws (all in the
southeast), I've definitely found it's best to have a cabinet to
choose from and never plan on a last minute run around the corner,
unless that's a viable solution. A backlog of good beer is a must; IMO
it covers all emergencies that you might not have something more
appropriate for, and no, I don't mean getting loaded and cutting up a
hitchhiker, I mean like an impromptu BBQ, or getting invited somewhere
on the spur of the moment. I'm sure you're familiar with what I'm
talking about.
Todd Michel McComb
2004-09-27 04:19:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
Sweet Jesus, two months in hell. Well, at least the food's good.
Oh, that's the entire trip, only part of which will be in the South.
William Ahern
2004-09-26 22:38:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by bizbee
Post by misha
If you're a veteran of a foreign war, join the VFW. If you've served in
the armed forces, join the American Legion. I'm pretty sure there are
plenty of posts in the South.
That's not going to fix anything in a dry county if you're looking to
buy a beer.
It did in Santa Rosa County in the Florida Pan Handle. No beer on Sunday's
and no liquor, period. However, you could find all of that in spades, plus
slot machines at the local VFW any day of the week.

I don't know if the VFW was somehow exempt, but regerdless no city offical
or cop was going to stop it. In the South you respect your elders, and if
grandpa wants to drink he drinks.
George Grapman
2004-09-26 22:50:26 UTC
Permalink
Strange laws in some states. I was able to get a drink in Salt lake
City on a Sunday night. Had to pay a few dollars to join a private club
and a local had to sponsor me.
In a midwestern county you were a club member of the bar at the
Holiday Inn if you stayed there or shared a table with a guest.
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bizbee
2004-09-26 23:41:43 UTC
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On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 22:50:26 GMT in
Post by George Grapman
Strange laws in some states. I was able to get a drink in Salt lake
City on a Sunday night. Had to pay a few dollars to join a private club
and a local had to sponsor me.
In a midwestern county you were a club member of the bar at the
Holiday Inn if you stayed there or shared a table with a guest.
Back in the '70's I flew into Atlanta Int'l. on what had been a
Saturday, but was now about five past midnight. Ordered dinner and a
glass of wine. The waitress looked at me like I'd just flown in from
the moon. I asked her what the problem was. She says "It's past
midnight, hun. No alcohol." OK, I've heard of such things in less
enlightened parts of the country (being those where they forget people
can buy liquor a day ahead of time and get as drunk as they please the
next day), but what surprised me was her attitude, like I was a
complete idiot for not knowing this. Of course, it probably wouldn't
have bothered me so much, if I wasn't in AN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT. Of
course, Atlanta was the same place my wife ordered a tea with her
breakfast, and the waitress gave her this odd look, then brought her
an iced tea... then <corrected> her when she asked for hot tea, with a
"Honey, if you want hot tea around here, you have to ask for it that
way...." Apparently the Holiday Inn doesn't train their servers that
people who stay in hotels don't generally come from that city and
aren't familiar with quirky ways... nor are they apparently capable of
using common sense, after probably hearing hundreds of people order
tea and then send it back, at 5:30 in the morning, expecting a drink
with their scrambled eggs. Would it ever occur to them to ask ahead of
time?
William Ahern
2004-09-27 17:53:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Grapman
Strange laws in some states. I was able to get a drink in Salt lake
City on a Sunday night. Had to pay a few dollars to join a private club
and a local had to sponsor me.
In a midwestern county you were a club member of the bar at the
Holiday Inn if you stayed there or shared a table with a guest.
When common behavior and the law conflict, one or the other gets twisted:

In Iran they have "sigheh", which among other things can serve to
legalize prostitution in a country where holding hands can get you
in trouble:

http://www.library.cornell.edu/colldev/mideast/tmpmrig.htm

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